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How To Dial In Your Chipping

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Transcription – How To Chip A Golf Ball

In this tip I am going to talk about the different ratios that you need to learn in order to chose the right golf club for the proper chip shot.

So, what is a ratio? Well, what it is, it’s the distance you’re going to be flying a golf ball vs. how far the ball is going to be rolling. So, what we need to do is, we need to calculate out, how far it is to the front of the green, about a yard onto the green. Because we’re going to be flying our ball about the yard onto the green with each of these different chip shots. Once we understand that amount we then look at our pin placement. And that will tell us how many of those,.. or how far that distance is compared to where we’re hitting our golf ball. So, in this situation right here, on the front of the green here, and I’m going to pace this off in the second. So you see, but if you look onto the very front, about a yard onto the green, that amount is about the same amount I have to roll the ball to that first hole. So, in this situation that would be a one to one ratio. Each of the different pin placements has a different ratio to it, and it’s very, very important that you understand this very clearly, because you want to be able to chose the right golf club for the appropriate chip shot. So, what I’m going to do, I’m going to pace off these different yardages, so that you understand exactly what club to hit in what situation. And understand the ratio, so then you can use that into the future.

So, I’m going to pace these off for you, I’m going to start with this, with this sand wedge. So, here we go, I got a sand wedge here, and I’m going to just pace it off to the front of the green, and you’ll get the feel for how far it is to hit a sand wedge. So, from here, one, two, three, four is the front of the green, and then five is where I’m going to be landing my golf ball. So, I’m five paces to right here. So, that’s where I’m trying to hit my golf ball. Now from here, I’m going to pace it off to the rest of the way to the hole. So, one, two, three, four, five. OK? So, right here, which is pretty much at this first 10 placement, I’ve got a one to one ratio. It’s pretty simple. So, one to one ratio, I want to hit a sand wedge. If you’re someone that has a lob wedge, anyone to chip with the lob wedge, feel free to do that, some people like using their lob wedge better than the sand wedge. Some people don’t even carry a sand wedge. I personally use the sand wedge, so out of one to one ratio, that is the golf club I am going to be using. Now, let’s take a look at the next pin. The next one, I’m going to be using a nine iron, so right here, right here I’ve got a nine iron. So, let’s pace this one off, and you’ll see what the ratio is to here. So, one, two, three, four is the front of the green. Five is where I’m going to be landing my golf ball. So, it’s five paces. Now I’ve got one, two, three, four, five to the first hole, which we’ve just talked about. One, two, three, four, five. Right here, this is where I’m going to hit a pitching wedge. This is halfway between this two holes. That is a one to two ratio. So, five to the front of the green, and this is 10 yards. So, this is more roll than how far I had to fly it. So, one part fly, equals two parts roll. That’s a pitching wedge. One, two, three, four, five. Now, I’m at this flag here. This is where I would hit a 9 iron. It’s five yards to the front of the green, and then it’s 15 paces to here. So, it’s a one to three ratio. So, hopefully you’re starting to understand how this works. You’re looking at the front of the green, and then you’re trying to look at the different pin placements. You’re tying to determine how far it is to fly it onto the very front of the green, about the yard onto the green, and then you look to see how much roll you need, and then you chose the right club. So, from right here, we’re going to go 7 iron all the way to that pin way down there.

That is going to be a one to five ratio, which you’ll see in a second. So, here I am. One, two, three, four is the front edge of the green. Five is where I’m going to land my ball. So, that’s one part fly. Now, we’ve got one, two, three, four, five. That’s one. One, two, three, four, five. This is a one to two ratio. One, two, three, four, five. This is the one to three ratio. One, two, three, four, five. This is the one to four ratio. This is where I would hit 8 iron. It’s half way between that hole and that hole, OK? So, now we go one, two, three, four, five and now I’m at the one to five ratio. This is where I’m going to hit my 7 iron.  Fly 7 iron about the yard onto the front of the green, and it’s going to go all the way there to that pin, because I know a 7 iron rolls five time as much, as I fly it. So, it’s pretty simple, we’re again looking at the front of the green, and again we’re tying to determine what club to hit in what situation. So, now I’m going to hit some different chip shots with the different clubs, so that you can see how each of these clubs hits the front of the ground, and then rolls to the different pin placements. We’re going to start with our sand wedge first, we’re going to hit the front of the green, and go to this first pin placement. We know that’s a one to one ratio, so this club should hit this ball to that pin…OK, so that was very good right there. We hit it within a couple feet, with our sand wedge. So, now we’re going to do a 9 iron, and you’ll see that this club, just in changing clubs, I’m not going to do anything different with my stroke. We’re going to get this club to go to the middle pin placement, because that is one to three ratio.

So, here we go…so there you go. That ended up about a foot away from the whole, with the 9 iron. So, I’ll hit the 7 iron now for you, and we’re going to go all the way back to the…all the way down there to that last pin placement. So, again, if I hit the front of the green, ball is going to roll all the way to the back, because I’ve got a 7 iron. And that’s a one to five ratio. So, here we go… OK, so, if you take a look at that, that ended up couple feet from a hole down there. So, just keep in mind what we want to try to do. We’re changing a golf club for the different pin placements based on a correct ratio. We measure this distance from here to the front of the green, where we’re going to land the ball. Then we measure that distance towards the hole. So, we’ve got a one to one ratio, which is the first hole here. We’ve got a one to two which will be a halfway between the first hole and the second hole. That’s going to be a pitching wedge. We’ve got a one to three which is the middle pin placement. One to four is halfway between the middle and the end pin placement. And then a one to five at the very end. Also, keep in mind that, if the pin or the green, sorry, is uphill, or downhill, you’re going to add or subtract a club to make up for the slope. So, if its uphill, you add a club. So, instead of the one to three ratio, maybe it’s a one to four ratio. So, you don’t hit it with a 9 iron, you hit it with a 8 iron. If it’s a downhill you take a club off, or subtract one from your ratio. So, instead of a one to three ratio, it’s a one to two. So, instead of the 9 iron you hit the pitching wedge. I would think the best thing to do is make a chart, so that you understand those different ratios, and then you can take them to the course’’’ with you, and you’ll be able to dial in the correct club for the right distance. In future tips I’m going to show you the stroke. Now you’ve got the ratios, you’ll understand how it all fits together. Make sure you ask your questions, post your comments below, I’ll try to get to it as many as I can.

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Paul Wilson is the creator of Swing Machine Golf and founder of Ignition Golf. Paul's golf swing technique is based on the Iron Byron swing machine. YouTube Channels: Paul Wilson Golf and Ignition Golf Tips. Please Join me on Google+